Suboxone is the combination medicine with Buprenorphine and Naloxone, prescribed by doctors for treating opioid addiction. It is an effective treatment process for the opioid use disorder as it reduces the opioid cravings and suppresses the withdrawal symptoms with its two main compounds. The primary ingredient of Suboxone is Buprenorphine, a partial opioid agonist, attaching to a receptor site but has less activating effect compared to the full agonist that initiates a chemical response. In this medication, a low dose of Naloxone is mixed with a high dose of Buprenorphine for reducing the abuse potential.

Buprenorphine, as tested, helps in relieving uncomfortable physical symptoms, including diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, and sleeplessness and it has also proven effective for relieving subjective feelings like fear and anxiety without causing the euphoric condition as created by full opioid agonists like heroin.

The use of opioids for a prolonged time changes drug tolerance, which means the dose of opioids should be increased for fulfilling the craving. Else, it causes withdrawal symptoms. Suboxone helps opioid-dependent people manage the withdrawal symptoms when they start quitting opioids.  You need a good suboxone doctor under whose supervision you can move from withdrawal phase to the maintenance phase. It comes in the form of a film and looks like a Listerine strip. The effectiveness of this medication helps people restrain euphoria for at least 24 hours.

Only doctors can prescribe suboxone for the addiction treatment along with mentioning the specific direction of dose. If a patient is using suboxone film, he/she is advised to place it under the tongue for using the right amount of medicines. Though the film dissolves itself, you need to make sure that not to chew or swallow the film that makes the medicine ineffective. Remember that do not talk when the film is in your mouth. If you are typing ‘Suboxone doctors near me’ on google, Norton Health Care helps you get rid of the opioid addiction with their Medication-Assisted Treatment.

Suboxone is a key drug used when it comes to medication-assisted treatment around opiate addiction. Combining naloxone and buprenorphine, it works by targeting those same brain receptors that are affected by other opiates ( like oxycodone, heroin, and morphine ), and by doing this, it essentially dulls the intoxication a person has to the other drug(s) they are addicted too, essentially helping with cravings.

Sadly, there is some stigmaaround Suboxone within the addiction community and public in general. Below are three common misconceptions around this medication:

  1. Can Be Abused

Like any opiate, Suboxone can be abused by individuals; however, it only partially contains an agonist of the main opiate receptor, and offers less of that “euphoric” feel other opiates provide. In most cases, individuals turn to Suboxone to assist with managing their opiate withdrawal, or to help them get off other more harmful opiate drugs.

  • Addicts Aren’t In Recovery With Suboxone

As society changes their standpoint on addiction, with many moving towards acknowledging this as a medical and chronic condition, some see Suboxone use as a treatment option for those who deal with this on-going issue; much like a person who is suffering from diabetes would require continual insulin shots. While “recovery” definitions in the past have focused on abstinence-based theories, addiction treatment continues evolve towards a more modern perspective as it relates to recovery.

  • Overdosing

It extremely hard to overdose on Suboxone alone, and very difficult to overdose on this medication when compared to other opiates. As mentioned, Suboxone has a limited opiate receptor agonist, therefore, there is restriction on the number of opioid receptors that the drug can activate. This means that thereisn’t a high risk around slowed breathing when taking the medication, unlike other opiates. Generally, when individuals have overdosed on Suboxone in the past, it is because they have mixed the medication with other sedatives.

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