Suboxone is a key drug used when it comes to medication-assisted treatment around opiate addiction. Combining naloxone and buprenorphine, it works by targeting those same brain receptors that are affected by other opiates ( like oxycodone, heroin, and morphine ), and by doing this, it essentially dulls the intoxication a person has to the other drug(s) they are addicted too, essentially helping with cravings.

Sadly, there is some stigmaaround Suboxone within the addiction community and public in general. Below are three common misconceptions around this medication:

  • Can Be Abused

Like any opiate, Suboxone can be abused by individuals; however, it only partially contains an agonist of the main opiate receptor, and offers less of that “euphoric” feel other opiates provide. In most cases, individuals turn to Suboxone to assist with managing their opiate withdrawal, or to help them get off other more harmful opiate drugs.

  • Addicts Aren’t In Recovery With Suboxone

As society changes their standpoint on addiction, with many moving towards acknowledging this as a medical and chronic condition, some see Suboxone use as a treatment option for those who deal with this on-going issue; much like a person who is suffering from diabetes would require continual insulin shots. While “recovery” definitions in the past have focused on abstinence-based theories, addiction treatment continues evolve towards a more modern perspective as it relates to recovery.

  • Overdosing

It extremely hard to overdose on Suboxone alone, and very difficult to overdose on this medication when compared to other opiates. As mentioned, Suboxone has a limited opiate receptor agonist, therefore, there is restriction on the number of opioid receptors that the drug can activate. This means that thereisn’t a high risk around slowed breathing when taking the medication, unlike other opiates. Generally, when individuals have overdosed on Suboxone in the past, it is because they have mixed the medication with other sedatives.

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